Traveling with children is always a difficult task. There are extra clothes to pack, frequent bathroom breaks to take, fights to break up, and the inevitable, “Are we there yet?” For parents of children who get carsick, however, it is more than just an inconvenience– even the shortest trip can be a nightmare. Fortunately, there are many ways to deal with this common malady.

Traveling with children is always a difficult task. There are extra clothes to pack, frequent bathroom breaks to take, fights to break up, and the inevitable, “Are we there yet?” For parents of children who get carsick, however, it is more than just an inconvenience– even the shortest trip can be a nightmare. Fortunately, there are many ways to deal with this common malady.

PREVENTION

Keeping nausea at bay is certainly preferable to cleaning up last night’s dinner from the inside of your car; however, many parents wait until their child starts complaining about not feeling good before they do anything. Instead of being one of them, try these common avoidance strategies.

•Encourage your child to look ahead.

When your child watches the roadside whizzing by or reads a book in the car, his brain receives conflicting messages. According to many doctors and scientists, this is the main cause of motion sickness. If you can convince your child to look at the road in front of him or keep his eyes on the far horizon, you may be able to prevent this phenomenon from occurring.

•Keep the fresh air flowing.

A stuffy car has a tendency to aggravate motion sickness, while fresh air can make a queasy child feel much better. Even if it’s cold outside, make a habit of cracking a window on every trip.

•Stop often.

This is probably the most important thing a parent can do to keep a child from getting carsick. Most children don’t start to feel sick until the car has been moving for at least a half an hour, so if you stop about that often you may be able to avoid the problem altogether.

•Consider medication.

For some children, the only thing that can stave off carsickness is a dose of Dramamine. In order to be effective, it must be taken about an hour before the trip begins. It is important to be aware, however, that motion sickness medicines can cause considerable drowsiness– you might not want to use this remedy if you need your child to be awake.

TREATMENT

Sometimes, even after everything a parent can do a child still gets sick. In that case,you might want to have one of the following remedies on hand:

•Ginger

In clinical studies, ginger was proven to relieve nausea almost as well as anti-nausea medication. It doesn’t cause drowsiness, and crystallized ginger tastes nearly as good as candy. It is also sold in tinctures, which are quick and easy to give to children.

•Mint

Mint has been known for centuries for its stomach-settling effects. You can buy it in herbal preparations, but sometimes even a stick of mint gum can do the trick.

•Deep breathing exercises

Even young children can be taught to do what is known as “square breathing,” and for many people it is a very effective nausea cure. First, instruct your child to breathe in slowly while counting to four. Next, tell him to hold his breath for another four counts. Then have him breathe out for four and finally, hold his breath again for four. Repeat this process until the queasiness goes away.

•Acupressure bands

These motion sickness bands work by putting pressure on the Nei Kuan acupressure point. They are safe for children as young as two, and although some doctors insist that there is no proof that they work, many parents swear by them.

Keeping nausea at bay is certainly preferable to cleaning up last night’s dinner from the inside of your car; however, many parents wait until their child starts complaining about not feeling good before they do anything. Instead of being one of them, try these common avoidance strategies.

•Encourage your child to look ahead.

When your child watches the roadside whizzing by or reads a book in the car, his brain receives conflicting messages. According to many doctors and scientists, this is the main cause of motion sickness. If you can convince your child to look at the road in front of him or keep his eyes on the far horizon, you may be able to prevent this phenomenon from occurring.

•Keep the fresh air flowing.

A stuffy car has a tendency to aggravate motion sickness, while fresh air can make a queasy child feel much better. Even if it’s cold outside, make a habit of cracking a window on every trip.

•Stop often.

This is probably the most important thing a parent can do to keep a child from getting carsick. Most children don’t start to feel sick until the car has been moving for at least a half an hour, so if you stop about that often you may be able to avoid the problem altogether.

•Consider medication.

For some children, the only thing that can stave off carsickness is a dose of Dramamine. In order to be effective, it must be taken about an hour before the trip begins. It is important to be aware, however, that motion sickness medicines can cause considerable drowsiness– you might not want to use this remedy if you need your child to be awake.

TREATMENT

Sometimes, even after everything a parent can do a child still gets sick. In that case,you might want to have one of the following remedies on hand:

•Ginger

In clinical studies, ginger was proven to relieve nausea almost as well as anti-nausea medication. It doesn’t cause drowsiness, and crystallized ginger tastes nearly as good as candy. It is also sold in tinctures, which are quick and easy to give to children.

•Mint

Mint has been known for centuries for its stomach-settling effects. You can buy it in herbal preparations, but sometimes even a stick of mint gum can do the trick.

•Deep breathing exercises

Even young children can be taught to do what is known as “square breathing,” and for many people it is a very effective nausea cure. First, instruct your child to breathe in slowly while counting to four. Next, tell him to hold his breath for another four counts. Then have him breathe out for four and finally, hold his breath again for four. Repeat this process until the queasiness goes away.

•Acupressure bands

These motion sickness bands work by putting pressure on the Nei Kuan acupressure point. They are safe for children as young as two, and although some doctors insist that there is no proof that they work, many parents swear by them.

Sarah Johnson works for Car Insurance Comparison.org.uk, a site that helps you save money on your premiums by comparing quotes. More money in your pocket means more trips for your family!


Categories : Children, Family, Ideas, Parenting

No Response








    headertile

    La Leche League

    What is a mother? Who shall answer this? A mother is a font and spring of life, A mother is a forest in whose heart Lies hid a secret ancient as the hills, For men to claim and take its wealth away; And like the forest shall her wealth renew And give, and give again, that men may live.
    (Francis Cardinal Spellman)


  • Sweet-Loves.net

    Welcome, friends & family sweeties! ♥ If you're here, you surely know me, but this special site is not dedicated to myself only... This site is a display of love to my wonderful hubby, my baby robots, my 'adopted' children all over the world and my plans for the future. :) Please, enjoy this little place and always be nice ♥
    Page Rank Check


  • For Mommies